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20121207
20121207
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and debbie, jim and debbie have raised four wonderful children. they got great grandkids, and i know jim is looking forward to staying involved in pushing the conservative cause outside the body. he was an effective voice in the senate, whether you agreed with jim or not. he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his positions and did it very effectively. jim made the republican party, quite frankly, look inward and do some self-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and
night. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts right now. >>> i'm atika shubert. we . we have breaking news coming in to us. according to the u.s. geological survey, a magnitude 7.3 magnitude earthquake strug off the coast of japan. a tsunami warning has been issued. i know it was felt very strongly there, alex. what can you tell us? >> well, atika, you mentioned some of the details. we were sitting in the office here in our bureau in tokyo, up on the ninth floor of this building. it's hard to describe, you can't really describe the feeling until you're into it. the one thing that grips me, i'm relatively new to living here in japan is the noise more than everything. everything basically shaking violently, our filing cabinets shaking. here's what i can tell you. you mentioned the 7.3 earthquake. a few other details just coming in. there are advisories -- pardon me, i'm looking off my notes. there are advisories for japan, but the pacific tsunami warning center has not issued a further alert beyond that. right now they're keeping it just to japan. we are hearing reports of possibly as m
's cory booker tomorrow night. it should be fascinating. that's it for us tonight. "ac 360" starts now. not trying to take sides. our goal is real reporting, finding out the truth. all calls out hip pock see. this is a baffling case of flip-flopping. this is a story we reported last night and is stranger the more we look into it. it's a long story, but stay with us. on tuesday the senate rejected a u.n. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. 125 other countries ratified this, but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving the treaty five votes short of ratification. what we learned today that's interesting is some of these same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support very publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip-flopper and kay bailey hutchinson of texas and senator jerry moran of kansas. we asked them all to come on the program and they declined. they're silent on this. senator moran was a co-sponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty. he even put a press release back in
forces in there in the street using politics and the ballot box. the point i was trying to stress, may last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face
. stay with me. it is basically weird. on tuesday, the senate rejected a u.s. treaty aimed at protecting the rights of disabled people around the world. it is modeled on the americans for disability act. 125 other countries ratified it but in the full senate 38 republicans voted no leaving it 5 votes short of ratification. what we learned today is that some of the very same senators actually supported the treaty before they voted against it. some even pledged their support publicly. senator roy blunt of missouri was a flip flopper and kay bailey hutchison and jerry moran of kansas. they all declined to come on the program. they're silent. senator moran was a cosponsor of the measure to ratify the treaty and put a press release back in may proclaiming support for the treaty. i want to show you something else. here's senator moran with former senator bob dole in june. dole, a war veteran, a listening time supporter of disability rights and advocate of this treaty. just before tuesday's vote, he came to the senate chamber, 89, frail in the wheelchair and thought it was that important to be
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
, theater commentator for klaw. chloe worked for several years in u.s. and uk theater companies and is the recipient of the allen wright award for arts journalism, the sundance institute arts fellowship and the nea fellowship of journalism. in 2006, she received a best columnist nomination at the annual san francisco media excellence awards and her first book on acting was published by farber and farber in the uk and farber, inc., in the united states. let's welcome phillip and chloe >> hi there, phillip. >> hi, chloe >> so, this play, it's been quite a journey. we're talking 3 1/2 years, maybe nearly 50 different drafts and 5 workshops? . >> five workshops, yes. >> so, looking back at the journey, how has it been for you and has it come out as you expected it would? . >> what's interesting is if you work on a play this long, normally there are times that it becomes redundant and you get a little bored with the piece. it's only natural. it's pushing 4 years now. this one was interesting in that it never got boring or ever felt redundant and each thing that we did over these almo
says, i used to draw it without air. its lines were easy to follow. and a girl says the sky today is lacking because the cypress is in pieces. and a young man says, no, the sky today is complete because the cypress is in pieces. and i say to myself, it's not obscure or clear. the cypress is in pieces. there is only this. the cypress is in pieces. . >> a poem i wrote shortly after 9-11. the terrorists for rachel cory and all those who were idealists and who actually believed that they could make an effect and social change. the terrorists who lives amongst us is not you, the terrorist who lurks in the shadows of our crowded city streets isn't me. he's not a demon with bulging eyes, a twisted mouth full of dirt, a crooked mouth, fangs driping blood. it's not the savage guner waiting for our school on their way to school. no, this heinous replica of satan doesn't look like a jew. dopt make a habit of supplying the motives of sin with colors of skin because it's skin deep. a student with dreams of statehood or a teenage girl driven by desperation and fear or a dentist or an apprentice
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)